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  • CIRDAP, as a Centre of Excellence, has completed its 40 years in enabling rural communities in the Asia-Pacific region. The 40th Anniversary of CIRDAP is a very special celebration for all of us. Over the last 40 Years, the Centre have witnessed great achievements and conducted numerous researches, pilot projects and training programs. This publication captures the glimpses of important events and milestones. The genesis of growth of the Centre along with few chronological events are also incorporated in the publication. Download the publication: 40 Years of CIRDAP
  • Ram, P.S, (eds.) Effendi, C., V. Rajendran, M.H. Kawsar. 2016. Arsenic In Drinking Water - A Case Study in Rural Bangladesh. Dhaka: Centre on Integrated Rural Development for Asia and the Pacific. Bangladesh is a tropical country. More than 75 per cent of the population is living in rural areas, who are vulnerable to the arsenic contamination. The alluvial aquifer that underlies the Ganges-Brahmaputra river basin contains arsenic in mineral form and has been widely tapped for obtaining drinking and irrigation water. For the past two decades, the water from over a million tube-wells has been slowly getting poisoned in majority of the villages. It is recorded that in 1970, a few villagers first noticed something was wrong when dark spots spread across their bodies. In 1993, they had finally learnt that they were drinking arsenic contaminated water when official tests showed 95 per cent of the village tube wells were contaminated. Considering the above, an attempt was made to study the Government and Community Initiatives for mitigating and preventing Arsenic problem in drinking water, in two sample blocks, namely, Brahmanapara and Lakshyam of Comilla District, Bangladesh. Download the Full book: Arsenic in Drinking Water - A Case Study in Rural Bangladesh
  • A study in four South Asian Countries: Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Sri Lanka with objective to increase the understanding of the underlying dynamics and the cross-cutting linkages of the Asian crisis focusing on their implications for South Asia. A major concern of the study was to examine the efficacy and adequacy of the policy and other adopted measures of the countries in response to the crisis and based on the lessons and findings of the study, identify appropriate concerns in future policy making.
  • Effendi, C., V. Rajendran, M.H. Kawsar. 2016. Climate Change Vulnerability - Cases from CIRDAP Member Countries. Dhaka: Centre on Integrated Rural Development for Asia and the Pacific. This monograph focuses on the impact of climate change – one of the key concerns for sustainable rural development. Six insightful articles based on studies in different CIRDAP Member Countries including Bangladesh, Fiji, Iran, Nepal and Thailand. The studies examine the vulnerability of the Asia Pacific region, how climate change is affecting agriculture and livelihood of the people and different adaptation and mitigations initiatives taken to address the challenges posed by climate change. Although some of the articles were published earlier in journals or in other forms, the continued relevance of their underlying themes across all CMCs makes the articles worthy for further dissemination. Download the full book: Climate Change Vulnerability - Cases from CIRDAP Member Countries
  • For establishing a comprehensive mechanism for knowledge generation, information dissemination and review of rural development (RD) and poverty alleviation (PA) processes at regional levels, CIRDAP is organizing regional policy dialogue on current issues relevant to its member countries. This publication is the report of the first policy dialogue held in October 2005 in Dhaka, where policymakers of different levels from the 14 member countries participated in and discussed emerging issues of RD and PA. For copies please write to: Information and Communication Division, CIRDAP.
  • The goal of cutting poverty cannot be seen separately as it is rooted in a whole system of inequality and injustice integrated in the system that need to be improved in terms of governance, transparency and people’s participation in the whole process. Inequalities and disparities within countries resulted by various contributing factors like marginalisation and discrimination on the basis of class, gender, location and ethnicity must be addressed.

  • This report is a consolidated one, based on the country studies entitled, Impact of Increase in Household income on Role and Status of Women within the Household, in CIRDAP’s Seven Member countries, namely, Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vietnam in collaboration with the Government of Japan and contains a review of policies, programmes pertaining to women empowerment as well as findings of the country studies in selected sites. It attempts to give a comparative picture of the women’s status in the seven countr ies, and comes up with certain policy prescriptions.
  • This report is based on the proceedings of the seminar, entitled “Governance, Partnership and Poverty”. The seminar was conducted at CIRDAP Headquarters in Dhaka, Bangladesh from 14 to 17 December 2002, and was well represented by the countries of the region, international organizations, and experts. The result was specialist presentations, discussions and recommendations, which are presented in this report for wider dissemination and action.
  • This report provides a reference source for understanding the concepts, methods, interventions and innovations aimed to make good governance a possibility. The intervention needs to vary according to the context from little changes in some cases to critical changes in other’s. As there is a basic infrastructure already available in the countries of the region, political commitment becomes the core problem. The problems on which good governance can be built are in the realm of rule of law, integrity, transparency, participation, accountability and efficiency. These rules are not only for the public sector but also for the NGOs, civil society organizations, private sector and all others involved in development. The report, based on the proceedings of the second workshop titled “Follow-up Workshop and Preparing Guidelines for Good Governance”, was held at CIRDAP during 18-22 April 2004 , presents an overall picture on various matters pertaining to governance.
  • TITLE: Impacts of Climate Change on Rural Livelihoods in CIRDAP Member Countries EDITED BY: Tevita G. B. Taginavulau and M H Kawsar Rudro PUBLISHED BY: Centre on Integrated Rural Development for Asia and the Pacific (CIRDAP)   Impacts of Climate Change on Rural Livelihoods in CIRDAP Member Countries – the Rural Development Report 2017 is the fourteenth of the CIRDAP biannual reports that explores the current status and future perspectives on how climate change may affect livelihoods of rural people in Asia and the Pacific region. This report examines the cause-effect relationship between climate change and rural livelihood through analyzing relevant data and policies. Rural areas are more vulnerable to climate change due to geographical location, land characteristics, high dependency on natural resource and high exposure to frequent climate induced natural disasters. Climate change is negatively affecting agriculture, food production and rural livelihoods in general. It may trigger a vicious cycle of poverty, resource degradation, environmental deterioration and social unrest. Based on the analysis of the findings of the study, it is recommended that the rural development and livelihood strategies of the future have to be understood as a continuum of urbanized and globalized systems. Integration of rural economies in the national economy and globalisation are increasing the inter-penetration between rural and urban. This means that rural policies have to be justified not only by their impact in rural areas, but by their contribution to national well-being. The leadership of the local government is particularly crucial to ensure the political momentum and support among external stakeholders in the process of tackling climate change. Research should be done to identify beforehand vulnerable areas and nature of disasters. Specific need assessment and disasters preparedness initiatives should be taken accordingly.   Since the immediate help comes from the community, the community organizations should be equipped with knowledge and skill regarding disaster preparedness and management. Knowledge and information sharing, including early warning of natural disasters and climatic events are essential to build the resilience of local livelihoods and communities to climate change. Exchange of technical information and sharing of technologies among countries needs to be encouraged. Special attention should be given to develop capacity of government officials, development practitioners and other stakeholders at national and local levels. The issue of climate change cannot be addressed in solace, but has to be integrated with the overall development plan to ensure sustainable and inclusive rural development. Cite the report: Taginavulau, Tevita G. B.; M H Kawsar Rudro. 2018. Impacts of Climate Change on Rural Livelihoods in CIRDAP Member Countries. Dhaka: Centre on Integrated Rural Development for Asia and the Pacific (CIRDAP). Download the report: https://bit.ly/2EArbOE